Burlington Acupuncture

Acupuncture for pregnancy and post-delivery

Acupuncture has been being used for over 3000 years for women during pregnancy. It is a safe and effective treatment for many of the symptoms that arise during pregnancy. A trained acupuncturist versed in the protocol for pregnancy is imperative. Acupuncture allow’s for women’s optimum health in the most important time in their lives. I see women in my practice often for all sorts of issues relating to pregnancy with much success.

Being pregnant can be difficult, morning sickness, back pain, ligament pain, constipation, heartburn, fatigue and gestational diabetes are problems that women can face in their pregnancy Acupuncture addresses all of the above. I use mainly acupuncture when treating pregnancy, I seldom use herbs during pregnancy, Less is more and Acupuncture is a very safe and effective modality for pregnant women.

The word balance is thrown around a lot but what better time to stop and regroup than when pregnant. We live in a very busy culture where taking the time for ourselves is not done. Pregnancy and post-delivery is the time to just stop, rest, and rebalance; take care of ourselves. There are many symptoms that arise during pregnancy and they are often perfectly normal maladies. They are also very treatable imbalances which acupuncture can help with.

I mainly see women in my office for morning sickness in the early weeks of pregnancy. If one is feeling sick acupuncture can be done once a week in the early weeks of pregnancy to quell nausea. I find once my patient feels better they can come maybe every other week or once a month is fine.

Acupuncture is a good thing to do at the end of your pregnancy when you are getting ready to go into labor. In TCM traditional Chinese medicine acupuncture is used to help with the induction of labor and as a way to just get things moving gently.

Stress is very high when getting ready to deliver a baby and acupuncture is so helpful in bringing about calm as well as more energy so that one can be strong and ready to deliver.

I often do acupuncture post-delivery.  My patients love how rejuvenating it is. My treatment principle would be to strengthen Qi, which is an unseeable vital energy. . This vital energy moves our blood. An ancient saying “Blood is the mother of Qi and Qi the commander of blood.”  Acupuncture can circulate the blood and nourish the blood. Nourished blood in this medicine brings about more energy and clearer thinking, always very good, when taking care of a newborn. Optimally as women, we want to rebuild our strength after childbirth. During post-delivery, women, are very vulnerable due to the loss of blood that happens with childbirth. Blood loss can give rise to the blues or just feeling over-emotional and exhausted.

Acupuncture and Chinese herbs are excellent methods to prepare for childbirth and rejuvenate after childbirth. Call Optimum Health Acupuncture for an appointment 802-859-8900

 

Acupuncture used to fight immunity and depression.

It has been cited in many studies that those suffering from depression: feeling sadness or hopelessness plays a significant role in patients who suffer from other chronic diseases . In a breast cancer study the woman suffering from depression had the fewest natural killer cells. It is believed  that part of the job of these cells is to fight cancer by patrolling the body for tumors starting to grow. The depressed patients had fewer of these cells, and also had tumors spreading more quickly to different parts of the body.

How to keep our fight? Acupuncture and Chinese herbs strengthen immunity. The Lung in Chinese medical theory is responsible for our Wei Qi , which  literally translates as fighting Qi. It is responsible for keeping our immunity strong and fighting off exogenous pathogens. The lung is directly affected by grief and sadness. It is very helpful to keep the lung meridian strengthened when one suffers from sadness or grief in order to stave off more serious diseases.

In my practice I see patients with low grade depression everyday. I treat both the heart and lung meridian. Heart signs and symptoms include insomnia and anxiety and a feeling of flatness.

Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine work very well to help combat depression and strengthen our immunity to fight disease. Come in and feel better. Call 802-859-8900 310 Pine St. Burlington Vt. 05401

 

 

 

 

Acupuncture can help with weight loss

In my practice I often have patients come in to lose weight.  Traditional Chinese medicine theory attributes excessive weight gain is caused by an imbalance in the body due to a deficiency in the Stomach/Spleen and liver organ systems.  As an acupuncturist I would stimulate points to facilitate hormonal rebalance and target the kidneys and endocrine systems to treat water retention. When weight gain is due to menopause or PMS there are meridians used to help the adrenals and reproductive system, which will bring balance to the body and help with weight loss.

I also use Chinese nutritional theory, which would uses food as medicine.  There are certain foods, which can speed up the metabolism and do specific things such as dry damp or move stagnation. An example would be radish, which is used to clear damp. Damp is a major culprit in weight gain.

Acupuncture relieves stress and promotes energy that alone can precipitate weight loss. I have patients who find weight loss to be a by-product of their treatment and they have not even tried to lose weight.

Acupuncture along with a food plan and exercise is a safe and reliable way to lose weight.

Call for an appointment, 802-859-8900 310 Pine St. Suite 108 Burlington Vt 05401

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Each Major Organ Corresponds to a Specific Emotion

By Margery Keasler
While doing my residency in China, I witnessed an unforgettable moment. I was sitting in on an intake with a very learned Acupuncturist when a rugged and strong Chinese man came in the clinic for urinary difficulty. He stood around 6' 3″ and was quite broad. The doctor asked the usual questions about his sleep, energy, digestion, etc. before asking him, “What are you afraid of?” The man’s expression shifted to that of a small boy and he answered, “The dark.”

I was intrigued by the Acupuncturist’s question and asked why he asked that. He explained that the five major organs all correspond to an emotion and that each organ is affected by its related emotion.

The kidneys are associated with fear. Fear makes qi descend, which can cause urinary trouble. Think of the expression I was so afraid I peed in my pants. The liver: anger. Anger makes qi rise quickly, so most symptoms are felt in the head as dizziness or headaches, perhaps. The Spleen: rumination. Rumination affects digestion, so signs and symptoms include bloating, distention, and gas. The lungs: grief. Greif manifests with colds or pneumonia. The heart: excessive joy. Joy can manifest as mania or depression.

Emotions are, of course, a natural part of being human. It is when these emotions become excessive or are repressed and turned inward that they can become a pathology and cause disease. In the above-mentioned man, fear of the dark was not the main cause of his urinary difficulty. But the emotion of excess fear is strongly considered when coming up with a diagnosis. The emotions are considered as a piece of the puzzle when ascertaining what we call a pattern in traditional Chinese Medicine.

Chinese medicine is both scientific and poetic. The humanity that took place in that intake reiterates why I love this medicine so much. The connection that took place when that man opened up to the practitioner and the dialogue that transpired was remarkable. The whole person was considered with both a very human and scientific approach, which I found both fascinating and profound.

Acupuncture is Effective for Treating the Symptoms of Menopause

 

Menopause is difficult. Walking outside in the heat of the day is debilitating. Our Moods shift quickly from fine to miserable. Depression, fatigue, and insomnia are the main complaints I hear in my office.

Chinese Herbal Medicine works miracles. Formulas are geared to Clear Fire and Calm Spirit. I have seen this medicine work and work well for the symptomologies of menopause.

At the end of my Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs study I went to the same University as my teacher in Harbin China there I focused on Women's issues during an internship. Women were tearing up their western medicine prescriptions and asking to be treated by Chinese herbal formulas. I was so impressed by the efficacy of these very well thought out concoctions.

These formulas since I attended school in China are so much easier to take. They come in the form of tiny pellets which are easy to carry and take. My patients often expect a convoluted formula which is time-consuming to make and not palatable, that is not the case. Some of the formulas names are translated from Pin Yin and are titled Calm Spirit or Build Immunity. Menopause is treated by Clearing Fire, Heart Fire, and Kidney Fire specifically.

A study (March 2011) tested the efficacy of acupuncture in treating the symptoms of menopause. The study placed women who were suffering from a variety of menopause symptoms, including hot flashes, into two groups. The control group received ‘sham’ treatments consisting of blunt needles that were not inserted into the body. The other group received acupuncture at 10 specified points. The trial consisted of treatment for 20 minutes, 2 times a week for a 5-week course of treatment. Patients in the control group enjoyed significant reductions in the severity of their symptoms when compared to the control group.

This comes as no surprise to anyone who has studied Chinese medicine. Chinese medicine has a history of treating gynecological conditions that date back over 2000 years. While acupuncture by itself can be effective in treating many conditions, the overall efficacy can often be increased by adding the prescription of Chinese herbs.

Feel better and Cool your Fire and Calm Spirit. Come in for a treatment, call 802-859-8900 310 Pine St. Suite 108 Burlington Vt 05401

 

 

Source: aim.bmj.com/content/29/1/27.abstract