Turning a Breech Baby

Traditional Chinese Medicine uses moxibustion, a technique which involves the burning of mugwort, a spongy herb shaped like a cigar and smokeless.  The herb is used to move and strengthen qi, which can in turn facilitate the turning of the baby into a downward position. In China, where this practice is common, there is a 75 percent success rate in turning breech babies. The highest success rate is when moxibustion is performed in the 34th week for a period of 7 to 10 days.

 

I myself experienced it first hand with my third baby. I was in Acupuncture school and had already had two caesareans with my boys. I was a skeptic when my teacher told me of the very high success rate that they have in  China. I had tried an external version, a process where the obstetrician manually tries to turn the baby with my first son and found it stressful and was not going to try that again. I gladly climbed up on the treatment table and she did moxibustion on my pinky toe. For me, it worked very quickly.  The next day I felt a significant flip in my womb. I called my obstetrician and did an ultrasound and much to my amazement my daughter had flipped and was head down. I was thrilled by the outcome. I had a VBAC, Vaginal birth after (two) caesareans.

 

Using inversion exercises prescribed by your midwife or OB and receiving acupuncture and moxibustion is a wonderful way to address the malposition of your baby you can also help along a transverse presentation.  The treatment  for breech presentation is very soothing and you leave feeling very relaxed and rejuvenated.  

 

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Acupuncture used to fight immunity and depression.

It has been cited in many studies that those suffering from depression: feeling sadness or hopelessness plays a significant role in patients who suffer from other chronic diseases . In a breast cancer study the woman suffering from depression had the fewest natural killer cells. It is believed  that part of the job of these cells is to fight cancer by patrolling the body for tumors starting to grow. The depressed patients had fewer of these cells, and also had tumors spreading more quickly to different parts of the body.

How to keep our fight? Acupuncture and Chinese herbs strengthen immunity. The Lung in Chinese medical theory is responsible for our Wei Qi , which  literally translates as fighting Qi. It is responsible for keeping our immunity strong and fighting off exogenous pathogens. The lung is directly affected by grief and sadness. It is very helpful to keep the lung meridian strengthened when one suffers from sadness or grief in order to stave off more serious diseases.

In my practice I see patients with low grade depression everyday. I treat both the heart and lung meridian. Heart signs and symptoms include insomnia and anxiety and a feeling of flatness.

Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine work very well to help combat depression and strengthen our immunity to fight disease. Come in and feel better.

 

 

 

 

Acupuncture can help with weight loss

In my practice I often have patients come in to lose weight.  Traditional Chinese medicine theory attributes excessive weight gain is caused by an imbalance in the body due to a deficiency in the Stomach/Spleen and liver organ systems.  As an acupuncturist I would stimulate points to facilitate hormonal rebalance and target the kidneys and endocrine systems to treat water retention. When weight gain is due to menopause or PMS there are meridians used to help the adrenals and reproductive system, which will bring balance to the body and help with weight loss.

I also use Chinese nutritional theory, which would uses food as medicine.  There are certain foods, which can speed up the metabolism and do specific things such as dry damp or move stagnation. An example would be radish, which is used to clear damp. Damp is a major culprit in weight gain.

Acupuncture relieves stress and promotes energy that alone can precipitate weight loss. I have patients who find weight loss to be a by-product of their treatment and they have not even tried to lose weight.

Acupuncture along with a food plan and exercise is a safe and reliable way to lose weight.

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Find relief for Menstrual Cramps

Acupuncture and Chinese herbs have been treating women's gynecological issues for over 2500 years. In my practice, I treat painful periods often and with great success.

Results for painful periods vary depending on how long the patient has suffered. I find that coming in once a week for a period of two months to be an ample treatment, and women notice significant results by their second cycle after receiving acupuncture.

Menstrual cramps in Chinese medical theory are attributed to a liver imbalance that is based on Qi (energy) and blood stagnation. (The liver is responsible for balanced circulation throughout the body.) Cramping pain is due to a congealing and stagnation of blood, which is why one often has big clots and some brownish color in the blood, both signs that qi is not moving the blood properly. Acupuncture simply moves blood and gets that stagnation flowing, which will lessen the pain.

Many women have resigned themselves to painful periods every month and consider it normal because they believe there is no treatment for it. That is simply not the case and suffering every month is not necessary. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs work beautifully to restore balance. Along with pain relief, women feel more energetic and less moody. 

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In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Each Major Organ Corresponds to a Specific Emotion

By Margery Keasler
While doing my residency in China, I witnessed an unforgettable moment. I was sitting in on an intake with a very learned Acupuncturist when a rugged and strong Chinese man came in the clinic for urinary difficulty. He stood around 6' 3″ and was quite broad. The doctor asked the usual questions about his sleep, energy, digestion, etc. before asking him, “What are you afraid of?” The man’s expression shifted to that of a small boy and he answered, “The dark.”

I was intrigued by the Acupuncturist’s question and asked why he asked that. He explained that the five major organs all correspond to an emotion and that each organ is affected by its related emotion.

The kidneys are associated with fear. Fear makes qi descend, which can cause urinary trouble. Think of the expression I was so afraid I peed in my pants. The liver: anger. Anger makes qi rise quickly, so most symptoms are felt in the head as dizziness or headaches, perhaps. The Spleen: rumination. Rumination affects digestion, so signs and symptoms include bloating, distention, and gas. The lungs: grief. Greif manifests with colds or pneumonia. The heart: excessive joy. Joy can manifest as mania or depression.

Emotions are, of course, a natural part of being human. It is when these emotions become excessive or are repressed and turned inward that they can become a pathology and cause disease. In the above-mentioned man, fear of the dark was not the main cause of his urinary difficulty. But the emotion of excess fear is strongly considered when coming up with a diagnosis. The emotions are considered as a piece of the puzzle when ascertaining what we call a pattern in traditional Chinese Medicine.

Chinese medicine is both scientific and poetic. The humanity that took place in that intake reiterates why I love this medicine so much. The connection that took place when that man opened up to the practitioner and the dialogue that transpired was remarkable. The whole person was considered with both a very human and scientific approach, which I found both fascinating and profound.